Don’t Be Fooled By Jailbait Archives

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If you’ve ever spent time browsing the internet, you know that it’s rife with opportunities to be tricked into visiting sites that claim to offer sexually explicit material, but instead lead netizens straight to a misdemeanour criminal record.

One such site is JailBait-Archives.com, which claims on its homepage that it offers “real jailbait galleries,” but in reality leads consumers straight to searches of mugshots and names of people who have been arrested for various offenses. While some of the names are those of individuals who have been arrested for particularly heinous crimes, the majority of search results point to arrests made on charges ranging from simple marijuana possession to more serious sex crimes like rape and child molestation. r JailBaitArchives.

The site’s homepage, which makes use of FBI-branding, encourages visitors to inscribe their email addresses in a form field with “Free Jailbait Gallery” in the subject line before launching a search.

When your email has been validated, you can then browse through galleries that feature underage sexual material obtained from popular social networking sites like Facebook.

Why you need not be fooled by JailBait Archives?

-While some of the teens pictured have had their identity stripped and details of their personal activity linked to government officials, others use the site as an opportunity to publicly shame themselves.

-The site’s homepage promises “real jailbait galleries,” yet includes many names that are not related to those who have been arrested. This is a clearly misleading statement, as many of them are self-identified by the individuals they appear associated with.

-While any person that appears on JailBait-Archives may have been arrested at some point in time, it is not your right to know for certain whether or not they were convicted.

How else can you be fooled by this website? 

-You might start by comparing its address (jailbait-archives.com) with the actual URLs of other sites that offer similar services, like JailbaitArchives.org, which is owned by a completely different individual.

-On a less serious note, you also need to be wary of misleading non-nude content found on this website. Many users apparently feel the need to post pictures of themselves dressed in suggestive clothing and making sexually suggestive poses in order to attract attention from friends and potential sexual partners.

-Don’t fall for it: the vast majority of these photos are not pornographic or even borderline pornographic in nature, but they could still wind up getting you into trouble if posted online without your knowledge or consent.

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How are people scammed by it?

-Although you won’t find this site mentioned anywhere on the web, an increasing number of people continue to fall victim to this deception.

-The site has received many negative comments from visitors who have been scammed by it, and has even attracted a fair amount of criticism after a few of its website’s posts made it into the media.

-Apparently, many people are still fooled by the page’s homepage and the FBI-branded message that greets them when they attempt to search for jailbait material, so it is important that you avoid being one of them. How to avoid being fooled by it?

-If you find yourself on the site, you should certainly avoid entering your email and information into the website’s search form. Doing so will not only expose you to a wide variety of scams and phishing attempts, but it could also come back to haunt you if the person who posted their profile photos ever finds their way onto JailBait Archives.

-You should also be able to recognize that all the material displayed during a search for jailbait is not only low-quality, but is also very likely fake, as many of those pictured have filled out their profiles with fake personal information in order to attract attention from people they’d like to meet online.

-The site’s homepage includes a link to the JailBait Archives Twitter page; however, this social networking profile is also likely to be fake, as there are no actual updates posted on it.

How much does it cost? 

-Currently the service is free, but the website suggests that users make donations to its operators via PayPal.

What is it? 

-This scam involves the use of malicious browser plugins by malware developers to infect victims’ computers with viruses and spyware. 

What happens? 

-Malicious browser plugins are able to bypass security protocols due to their trusted nature (they’re usually developed by well-known software companies) and appear as harmless tools bundled in popular downloads like freeware and shareware. 

-Once installed, the plugins collect personal information like login credentials and bank account details, which are then transmitted to remote servers for the purpose of stealing passwords, account information and even entire databases. 

-The most common plugins associated with this scam are MoneyTree and iLivid.

How does it work? 

-Most pop ups require users to visit a second website that is responsible for loading the malicious plugin in a victim’s browser. What’s more, these sites can sometimes masquerade as legitimate software companies or government websites in order to fool unsuspecting users into installing them.  

-They may also be found on message boards that contain links to third party applications or media players containing malicious code.

Conclusion:

The browser plugin is created to mimic popular software or installers, in order to trick people into downloading and installing the malicious plugin without knowing it.

How can you avoid being scammed by them?

It should be easy enough to avoid falling victim to this scam. All you need to do is take extra care when downloading software from websites that you’re unfamiliar with, and never click on any other links that are sent your way.

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